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Monthly Archives: May 2015

  • Summer With Your Spa

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      Sweet summertime has finally arrived and pools are opening up, big time! However, don’t be so quick to close up that hot tub for a couple months. One big misconception that many have about their spa is that they can’t use it as much during the summer. By keeping your water and tub clean, and the temperature just right, your spa can actually be enjoyed in many ways all twelve months of the year!

     

    It’s Squeaky Clean: To get your spa ready for summer you should begin by cleaning the filter of your tub. This filter cleaner can be used to remove any of the scum, oils, or gunk from the cartridge of the filter. Be sure to continue cleaning your cartridge throughout the summer and rest of the year, by soaking your cartridge in the cleaner and water solution for about 24 hours. After that, rinse your cartridge and it will be ready to use.

     

    Test Away!: After cleaning your cartridge, be sure to use these testing strips to measure Chlorine, Bromine, Alkalinity, Total Hardness and pH levels. Measuring these levels will assure you that the chemicals in your water are safe for you to be exposed to and you can use your spa. If levels are uneven, be sure to contact a consultant at Spas and Stuff to help you add the proper amount of chemicals required.

     

    Keepin’ it Cool: Warm summer temperatures call for a nice cool down, so turning your spa’s temperature down to 85 degrees or even turning the heater off, allows you to have a nice, relaxing time. For the cooler summer nights, your spa’s regular temperature may be just right. To make sure the temperature is just the way you’d like it, you can help monitor it in your spa with this floating thermometer. If you have a pool, feel free to use this for your pool as well. The floating feature prevents this tool from being pushed around or to the bottom by the jets of your spa.

     

    Fit & Fun: Summer is a time where many like to get in shape and stay active. You may not consider your hot tub a place where you can exercise – but think again! With tight muscles, that warmer water will help to loosen you up and prep you for some minor exercises you can do in your spa. The jets of the spa will help your body to recover from workouts, by massaging the muscles and relieving you from tightness in your back and neck. In any temperature, you can stretch or do small leg exercises like calf raises to help strengthen those muscles. Small squats in your spa will also help to increase your temperature and weight loss.

     

    With these helpful tips your spa will be ready to use for those laid-back summer days with family, staying active or fun nights with friends. Please contact your local Spas and Stuff with any questions.

     

     

  • How to Buy a Hot Tub: Asking the Vital Questions

    You've made the decision to purchase a hot tub for your home, and it's an investment you'll undoubtedly enjoy for years to come! If you think the decision-making is done because you've opted to purchase a hot tub, think again. You still have a number of small, yet important, questions to answer before you install a new hot tub on your property (inside or out). Below is a rundown of the questions you should ask yourself as you contemplate your big purchase.

     

    Is This Safe for Me?

    Hot tubs are a great way to entertain your friends and family, as well as enjoy supreme relaxation after a rough day or week at work. However, hot tubs should be used with particular attention and care. The average temperature of the water ranges from 100 F to 102 F, with a maximum recommended temperature of 104 F. While it is good for relaxation and relief of sore muscles or joints, those with heart conditions or other medical issues should consult a doctor before using a hot tub. Keep this in mind as you think of all the potential users of your new hot tub!

     

    How are You Going to Use the Hot Tub?

    Obviously you are going to be using the tub for entertainment and relaxation, but what level of usage do you expect? Are you investing in this hot tub for use on a daily basis, or infrequently as you see fit? Is this more for entertaining or do you intend to use it heavily for hydrotherapy purposes? You'll want to research the energy use of a tub you'll use on a daily basis, as well as the standby power use of a model you will use infrequently.

    If you plan to simply entertain and add to the environment of your home with a hot tub, certain features (such as the number and type of jets) don't matter as much. However, a hydrotherapy tub should have lots of high-powered jets to cater to your needs.

     

    Where are You Installing the Tub?

    This is the biggest question you need to answer. Are you going to place your new hot tub indoors or outdoors? An outdoor hot tub needs to have good insulation so that it holds in the heat and saves you from constantly running the pumps and heaters to keep the water at the proper temperature. This is particularly important if you live in a cooler climate.

    If you are placing the tub indoors, you need to give careful consideration to where you install. The room you choose must be well ventilated to avoid rot, mold, and mildew buildup. The physical space should be well supported (if located on an upper level), and the location and voltage of outlets is also worthy of consideration. It is also a good idea to measure doorways and entry points to ensure you can get to the tub to its desired location.

     

    Buying a new hot tub for your home is like buying the home itself. You would never buy a home without stopping to consider whether or not it meets your needs. You should exercise the same caution and consideration when buying your next hot tub.

     

     

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