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hot tubs

  • How to Care for Your Inflatable Hot Tub

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    Inflatable hot tubs are an excellent option for those consumers lacking the space, or possibly the budget to purchase a fixed position hot tub. Inflatable tubs come with their own set of differences compared to built-in models, and they also come with a different set of maintenance and care guidelines that should be followed. Whether you're moving, looking to store your hot tub in the coming months for winter, or just cleaning it, this post offers helpful steps to assist you in caring for your inflatable hot tub.

     

    Keep Your Hot Tub Covered

    This tidbit applies to any hot tub, but can be particularly important in the long-term use and care of an inflatable hot tub. Using a cover on your hot tub helps prevent debris from the surrounding environment from settling in the water and potentially clogging your filters. Additionally, a cover helps collect water vapor as it condenses on the lid, dripping back into the tub. This helps reduce, but does not eliminate, the loss of solids such as calcium from precipitating out of the water.

    On top of everything else, a good cover helps prevent fluctuations in the temperature of your hot tub. When this occurs, you'll wait less for the hot tub to warm up before use, and save energy costs.

     

    Empty the Tub Regularly

    Inflatable hot tubs have a few advantages compared to their built-in, rigid cousins. The easiest way to clean your tub from top to bottom is to drain the water and wash down the sides and seats. This task is more difficult in a traditional tub. An inflatable tub is easy to empty, and can be cleaned with warm, soapy water.

     

    Cleaning the Empty Tub

    Once you've cleaned the empty tub, you'll find it much easier to clean because you won't need to use any special cleaners. As mentioned above, warm, soapy water is enough to get the job done. In fact, using abrasive cleaners when caring for your inflatable tub can actually compromise the durability and strength of your inflatable tub's walls. Once you have emptied the tub and cleaned its sides, make sure to thoroughly rinse your tub of soapy water before refilling it and using it next.

     

    Should I use Soft Water?

    Using soft water in a hot tub or pool is not recommended. The salt used is an additional dissolved solid in your water, and it can be very difficult to balance the pH if soft water is used.

     

    Winterizing

    Finally, if you're getting ready to store your inflatable hot tub in the next few months as winter temperatures descend on the country, you'll want to proceed with caution. After you've emptied the tub, cleared the filters and heaters, make sure you store everything in a warm, dry location. Before storing the tub itself, give it ample time to dry out. Water can freeze and thaw, expanding and contracting throughout the winter, and compromise the integrity of your inflatable hot tub.

     

    Inflatable hot tubs are easy to set up, can be moved from one location to the next easily and provide the same benefits as a regular hot tub for a lot less. If an inflatable hot tub sounds like something you’d like to own for your home,

     

  • Hot Tubs & Kids

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    Using your spa is a great way to relax and enjoy some time alone or with family and friends, but it’s very important to be extra careful when children are in the hot tub. Ultimately, your spa can be a great place for kids to relax too, but there are several safety precautions that should be taken before bringing a child into a hot tub. Here at Spas & Stuff, we want to make sure you’re taking advantage of all of the fun things to do with your spa when your kids are in it, while remaining safe at the same time.

    Safety is Key: Safety first! Staying safe in your spa is the most important thing. Children under the age of five should not be using the spa, as young children tend to overheat faster than adults. If your child is five years old or older, have them stand in the center of the hot tub. If he or she is tall enough to be in the center of the tub without their head under water, they are tall enough and old enough to be in the hot tub. The reasoning behind this test is to prevent drowning. This unnecessary tragedy can be prevented by keeping a close eye on your child, only letting them stay in the spa for fifteen minute sessions, and making sure they meet height and age requirements.

    Activities, Activities, Activities!: As much as your spa is a place to relax, it can also be a place to socialize and have fun. Whether your older kids are having some friends over to enjoy some time in the spa or you’re looking for something fun to do with the little ones, your spa can be the place! One activity you can do with kids is a backyard scavenger hunt. Set up fun riddles and prizes around your deck or backyard and have the final destination be the hot tub! Or, have the kids enjoy a scavenger hunt while you keep an eye on them from the spa. If your kids are too old for a scavenger hunt, you can easily set up some snacks and beverages at a nearby table so that they can socialize. Just make sure to leave the food outside of the hot tub!

    Accessories on Accessories: Your spa is obviously not as large as a pool, so there is not enough room for large floats and rafts, however there is plenty of room for other fun accessories! Your kids can easily bring in small pool toys to play with and you can purchase accessories like the Deluxe Spa Head Rest and the Deluxe Spa Seat Cushion to help you feel as comfortable as possible when in your spa.

    With small accessories and little games to play, it’s easy to have a good time with kids in your hot tub. Just remember to be safe when using your spa! If you would like to experience the fun of owning your own home spa, check out our selection of hot tubs for sale, here! We even provide free shipping to 48 states!

     

  • How to Buy a Hot Tub: Asking the Vital Questions

    You've made the decision to purchase a hot tub for your home, and it's an investment you'll undoubtedly enjoy for years to come! If you think the decision-making is done because you've opted to purchase a hot tub, think again. You still have a number of small, yet important, questions to answer before you install a new hot tub on your property (inside or out). Below is a rundown of the questions you should ask yourself as you contemplate your big purchase.

     

    Is This Safe for Me?

    Hot tubs are a great way to entertain your friends and family, as well as enjoy supreme relaxation after a rough day or week at work. However, hot tubs should be used with particular attention and care. The average temperature of the water ranges from 100 F to 102 F, with a maximum recommended temperature of 104 F. While it is good for relaxation and relief of sore muscles or joints, those with heart conditions or other medical issues should consult a doctor before using a hot tub. Keep this in mind as you think of all the potential users of your new hot tub!

     

    How are You Going to Use the Hot Tub?

    Obviously you are going to be using the tub for entertainment and relaxation, but what level of usage do you expect? Are you investing in this hot tub for use on a daily basis, or infrequently as you see fit? Is this more for entertaining or do you intend to use it heavily for hydrotherapy purposes? You'll want to research the energy use of a tub you'll use on a daily basis, as well as the standby power use of a model you will use infrequently.

    If you plan to simply entertain and add to the environment of your home with a hot tub, certain features (such as the number and type of jets) don't matter as much. However, a hydrotherapy tub should have lots of high-powered jets to cater to your needs.

     

    Where are You Installing the Tub?

    This is the biggest question you need to answer. Are you going to place your new hot tub indoors or outdoors? An outdoor hot tub needs to have good insulation so that it holds in the heat and saves you from constantly running the pumps and heaters to keep the water at the proper temperature. This is particularly important if you live in a cooler climate.

    If you are placing the tub indoors, you need to give careful consideration to where you install. The room you choose must be well ventilated to avoid rot, mold, and mildew buildup. The physical space should be well supported (if located on an upper level), and the location and voltage of outlets is also worthy of consideration. It is also a good idea to measure doorways and entry points to ensure you can get to the tub to its desired location.

     

    Buying a new hot tub for your home is like buying the home itself. You would never buy a home without stopping to consider whether or not it meets your needs. You should exercise the same caution and consideration when buying your next hot tub.

     

     

  • 4 Must-Have Spa Accessories

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    When you purchase a new spa for your home, you don't necessarily get all the accessories you would want to supremely enjoy your investment. Sure, your new spa comes with heaters and pumps required to provide you with warm, relaxing water, but there are multiple accessories available for purchases that enhance the joy of spa ownership. The question is; which accessories are the must-have extras that you should purchase?

     

    Spa Cover Lifts

    Now that you've purchased a new spa and had it installed on your patio, deck, or in the backyard, you want to protect your investment from the elements. Whether or not you live in an extreme environment like the desert of the Upper Midwest, there are always natural elements you want to keep out of your spa. A good (and included) cover will keep rain water out, making it easier to control the temperature, and also keep out dirt, dust, and debris that can clog your filters and potentially damage the pump.

    However, do you want to lift the cover off on your own every time? Spa cover lifts are an affordable solution that make it easy to place and remove the cover on your spa. Some are motorized, while others use leverage to make it easy for you to lift and remove the cover manually.

     

    Hybrid Tables and Stools

    If your spa is the centerpiece of a greater outdoor patio area, you'll want some high-quality pub tables and stools to provide the finishing touches to your environment. Hybrid tables are available in long, rectangular forms, pub-table designs, and half-circle tables. Constructed using Envirotech materials, these tables will not crack, fade, or deteriorate, which makes them a perfect addition to your outdoor entertaining area. Stools made with Envirotech materials are also available to match each table mentioned.

     

    Spa-Mount Tables

    There's nothing better than enjoying a nice cold beverage while you're relaxing in your spa. Whether you want to stay hydrated with cold water, sip a cold beer, or entertain friends with margaritas, spa-mount tables are available to help everyone enjoy a drink with ease. As the name suggests, these tables can be mounted to the side of your spa to create storage space where you and your guests can set drinks without worrying about holding them, or spilling them, in the spa.

     

    Spa Steps

    How do you plan to get in and out of your spa? There are a myriad of spa steps available to make it easier for you and your guests to get in and out of your spa. Rather than using cheap ladders or boxes from around the house as a makeshift step, you can purchase attractive, sturdy spa steps to make getting in and out a breeze.

    Select from a single step constructed out of Envirotech materials, a two-step model made of Redwood for a classic look, or even a half-moon design two-tier step for a unique look. There are plenty of options. Your creativity is the only limit when it comes to adding to your spa with unique steps.

     

    With these four accessories, your spa can be more than just a hot tub in your backyard. These accessories add to the value of your hot tub and help create an enjoyable environment that is perfect for entertaining.

     

    Browse our full selection of hot tub accessories at spasandstuff.com for even more outdoor entertaining options!

     

  • It’s All About the Hot Tub

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    For a long time, home décor trends focused on bringing the outside in. Placement of plants that were an extension of outdoor gardens made sun rooms appear as part of the backyard.

    Today’s trends tend toward bringing the inside out. Elegantly upholstered outdoor furniture and stunning area rugs are transforming decks and patios like never before. Light fixtures rated for outdoor use illuminate cozy alcoves from which to read or enjoy an evening cocktail. Add a little simmer of a crystal clear spa and your backyard becomes a welcome extension of your home.

    Regardless of where your hot tub is situated, there is an endless supply of additions you can add to showcase your own unique style. You can basically dress your hot tub as you would a favorite room in your home….so it reflects your personality.

    1. An easy and affordable way to “decorate” your spa is to frame it with potted plants – whether ferns or flowers, they will add dimension to the area – and perhaps a bit of aromatherapy!
    1. Another addition that is one of our favorites is a cantilever umbrella. Available in multiple shapes and styles, they boast rotating hubs that allow 360° They’re particularly attractive as they not only shield from sun overexposure; they add personality to the spa.
    1. Chunky pillar candles on wrought iron stands also make a statement.
    1. If you love a good DIY project, you can take recycled pieces of wood to fashion a privacy wall or a decorative screen. Depending on your level of expertise (and patience!) you can build a bench where you can sit to remove your slippers and also use as storage to stow towels.
    1. If the budget allows, an outdoor fireplace will definitely add depth of ambiance.

    At the end of the day, you want your home to be your refuge, your oasis. While we certainly recommend one of our hot tubs for all your relaxation needs, we think it is equally important to make it your own -- put your twist on it to personalize the experience. Send us your pictures of how you decorated your spa. We love the ideas our clients come up with!

  • How to Buy a Hot Tub: Choosing the Right One for You

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    A hot tub is a major purchase that can add value to your home and your life. There are a number of decisions you'll need to make in order to find one that's just right for you and your lifestyle. Make a good purchasing plan and stick to it--you'll be soaking in bubbles in no time.

    Determine Your Budget

    This is a good place to start, but it's also a tricky one. As you go through and make other choices, you may find you need to shift your budget or make compromises to stay in budget.

    Hot tubs can vary drastically in cost. A small inflatable hot tub can start around $700, and a large hot tub with all the bells and whistles can run tens of thousands of dollars.

    Our Alpine Portable Inflatable Hot Tub is only $665! A great starter spa.

    You can either make a list of features you want and shop for the best deal, or you can set a dollar amount and shop within that range. It's up to you! Just make sure you stick to your budget and don't get swayed by features you don't actually want or need.

    How Many Bells? How Many Whistles?

    When crafting your budget, ask yourself what features you must have, what features would be nice, and what features you simply don't need or want. Do some online research --there are a lot of options for hot tubs these days. Color therapy, cascading waterfalls, speakers and dvd players ... .

    Or maybe you just want the basics: tub, heater.

    The Bellagrande SLT has ALL the bells and whistles and free shipping too!

    Portable or Permanent?

    What bells and whistles you can get, of course, depends on whether you get a portable or a permanent hot tub.

    Portable tubs are soft-sided, sometimes inflatable, and they permit you to move the hot tub whenever you wish. Some are even designed for easy set up and travel, such as for camping trips. Typically, they'll have fewer fancy features but are more affordable. They can be plugged into wall outlets, too.

    Permanent hot tubs are hard-sided and will be long-term occupants of the space where you install them. They'll need access to plumbing and electricity, and the electrical work will need to be inspected by a licensed electrician. The costs are higher, but they'll last longer and have more choices for features.

    The Matter of Size

    Hot tub for just you? Or maybe a romantic partner too? Or maybe a couple of kids as well? Or maybe the whole family and some of the neighbors?

    Quite simply, the bigger the hot tub the more it will cost to purchase and maintain. The smaller the tub, the easier the cleaning and care. Or maybe you need a hot tub for hydrotherapy--there are models available that let you stretch out and swim against the jets. Don't forget to consider the size of the space where you will be putting the tub.

    Our Swim Spa is 16 feet long! When you're done swimming, get the whole neighborhood in there!

    Is it Comfy?

    Ostensibly, you'll be spending some quality time in your hot tub, so it needs to be comfortable. A tub that is comfortable for one person may not be for another. It's important to choose one that accommodates your height and weight comfortably. Also consider whether you want to stretch out lounge-style or sit upright. When others are in the tub, will they all have space or be crowded together? If you are getting one with a screen for viewing movies, can you comfortably watch without straining your neck? If you are getting one with speakers, can you easily hear the music or is it too close to your ears? Do any waterfall features or control panels get in the way? These are all things to consider.

    Check Out the Jets

    With hot tub jets, more is not necessarily better. Placement and functionality is much more important. Consider where the jets are placed--do they actually cause discomfort when you sit in the tub? Are they adjustable? Do they have too much power? Not enough?

    Find a Reputable Retailer

    Once you've got your budget and you've planned out what you are looking for in a hot tub, it's crucial you find a good retailer who will help you select a hot tub. Here at Spasandstuff.com, we are more than happy to answer all your questions and assist you with selecting the perfect tub. We stay with our customers after their purchases, helping them with their maintenance questions, assisting them with choosing cleaning supplies, and in return they stay with us because they know we are looking out for them.

    Our customers have left us some great reviews you can check out here. If you think you are ready to buy the perfect hot tub for you, contact us and we'll get you started.

  • How to Maintain a Hot Tub

    How to Maintain a Hot Tub

    It requires regular care and some supplies, but with a little practice you'll be a hot tub maintenance pro in no time!

    Use test strips twice a week.

    The container that holds the strips should have a chart for you to follow. Compare your results with the chart and adjust the chemicals as needed. Focus on keeping balanced chlorine and pH levels first, and worry about the other levels after.

    You want to see the chemistry in the following ranges:

    • 1-5ppm of free chlorine or bromine, depending on which sanitizer you're using
    • The pH should be as close to 7.4 as you can get. A range of 7.2-7.8 is fine.
    • Calcium hardness: 125-400ppm
    • Total alkalinity: 120-180ppm

    Add one chemical at a time.

    When you adjust chemical levels, add one chemical at a time, then wait two hours before adding another. This gives the chemicals time to disperse natually and minimizes any toxic chemical reactions that might occur from mixing chemicals.

    Change the hot tub water completely every 3, 4, or 6 months.

    How often you change the water depends on how often you use the hot tub and how it looks. More use means you'll need to change it more frequently, but if you haven't used it in a while and things look a little off, change it. At a minimum, you should be changing the water 2-4 times a year.

    Condition the hot tub cover monthly.

    Conditioning prolongs the life of the cover by protecting it from UV rays. The cover keeps your tub clean, so it's important that it fit well and be in good shape.

    Hot Tub Maintenance Tips

    • Buy only quality hot tub chemicals from swimming pool and hot tub stores. Cheaper chemicals purchased from general stores are not as effective, which makes them less cost-effective in the long run.
    • Conditioners are for the outside of the hot tub cover only, not the inside.
    • If you are seeing foam in your water, it is usually caused by lotions washing off of people's skin or detergents in swimsuits. Make sure hot tub users rinse off before getting in.
    • Yellow water usually indicates very low pH.
    • Using an ozone generator will reduce the amount of chlorine or bromine you need to use.

    For more tips and troubleshooting, view the Spasandstuff.com Maintenance FAQ here: http://www.spasandstuff.com/hot-tub-and-spa-water-chemistry-FAQ

    Shop for quality hot tub chemicals at affordable prices here.

     

  • Using Hot Tubs to Manage Depression

    Using a Hot Tub to Manage Depression photo by Andrei Niemimäki

    As many as 10% of Americans suffers from depression at some point, with many experiencing chronic depression or depression as part of other mental illnesses such as Bipolar Disorder. Depression can lead to a host of other health issues and, while treatable, therapy and medication costs can add up. Hot tubs can be a great way to alleviate depression symptoms, and may even help stave off the blues altogether with regular use.

    How Hot Tubs Can Help with Depression

    Soaking in the hot water of a hot tub releases endorphins. Endorphins are a feel-good chemical--they cause you to feel contentment and pleasure, and reduce the effects of stress. They also contribute to deep, restful sleep. Sleep is the body's natural way of reducing stress and balances moods. Those who regularly use a hot tub can experience calmer, more even temperaments and fewer episodes of anxiety and depression.

    Relaxing in a hot tub releases endorphins, the body’s natural “feel good” chemical. This chemical helps reduce the effects of stress on the body and leads to long, deep sleep. Relaxing in a hot tub for 10 minutes approximately 90 minutes before bedtime will turn the temperature down on your internal thermostat and help you drift to sleep. With better sleep, reduced stress, and the presence of endorphins, hot tub soakers may experience calmer temperaments and fewer bouts with anxiety and depression.

    The process of using a hot tub to stave off or manage depression has three components:

    • Heat: Immersing yourself in heated water causes the body's core temperature to shift. This shift leads to a feeling of relaxation and can alleviate insomnia.
    • Massage: Massage has long been touted for its healing benefits. The jets in a hot tub have a similar effect on the body, but instead of focusing on one part of the body at a time, the entire body is massaged at once. The massage forces the muscles to relax, and where the body leads, the mind follows: your mind will relax and stress alleviated, which elevates mood.
    • Buoyancy: The buoyancy of the hot tub water relieves stress on the body, particularly the joints. The relaxation of the body, the alleviation of stress-related aches/pain, and the hydrostatic pressure increases improves circulation and respiration. Increased oxygen and blood to the brain is known to alleviate depression symptoms and regulate mood.

    Hot Tubs are not a Substitute for a Doctor's Care

    Hot tubs can be a great way to manage and even stave off depression, especially in cold seasons when your bones really need to be warmed up. However, chronic depression is a serious condition and requires a doctor's care. If you suffer from depression or suspect you do, consult your doctor about your symptoms.

    Above all: Be well. And happy soaking!

     

  • Hot Tub vs Spa vs Jacuzzi

    You might hear the words "hot tub", "spa", and "Jacuzzi" used interchangeably, but are there actual differences between the words?

    While researching this article, we found that there is some disagreement--even among industry professionals--about what these different words mean and when they should be used. However, you can use the information below as a rough guide.

    Hot Tubs

    hot tub vs spa vs jacuzzi photo by Wood and Wellness Ermelo via Flickr

    "Hot tub" is probably the word you will hear used most often, as it is the most generic of the three terms. At its most basic definition, it could be used to mean any hot bath or basic of water. More specifically, however, it is used to describe tubs made of wood, sometimes with a liner set inside, often with wood-burning stoves or some other form of heating. They can sometimes offer jets, but often don't, and they typically don't have contoured seating. This is the original style of tub, and they traditionally resembled large wooden barrels full of hot water. Hot tubs have a long history, but most recently became very popular in private homes in the 1960s.

    Spas

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    The word "spa" basically describes a hot tub that is equipped with jets. Most are made out of fiberglass or acrylic. The term "spa" was first used in 1596 to describe the Harrogate, an enclosed well that contained medicinal water built by William Slingsby. Slingsby had visited a Belgium town called Spa, which was--and still is--renowned for its healing cold springs. When the hot tub industry began building tubs out of fiberglass and acrylic, they co-opted the word "spa" as a nod to the Belgian town and lend an air of elegance and luxury to this new product.

    Jacuzzis

    Strictly speaking, "Jacuzzi" is the brand name of a company that manufactures spas, and the word should always be capitalized. In 1968, Candido Jacuzzi invented a self-contained whirlpool bath for his young son, who was born with rheumatoid arthritis. It was an instant success and within a few decades the company name became nearly synonymous with the invention itself.

    So Which One Should You Use?

    Colloquially, the three terms are interchangeable. Alternatively, you could use the phrase "hot tub spas" as a good catch-all for any unit that holds and/or heats water and may or may not be equipped with jets.

  • Hot Springs: The Original Hot Tubs

    Hot Springs: The Original Hot Tubs photo by Chris 73 / Wikimedia Commons

    The inspiration for the hot tub is undoubtedly the natural hot spring. From time immemorial mankind has been soaking in hot springs for pleasure, for good health, and for religious reasons. It's no wonder that so many people want one located just outside their back door.

    What, Exactly, is a Hot Spring?

    Hot springs are created when geothermally heated groundwater seeps up from the Earth's crust. Geothermal heat is heat from the Earth's mantle: in general, the temperature of rocks in the earth increases the deeper you go. In non-volcanic areas, if water is deep enough in the crust it becomes heated by the rocks. Any that seeps up to the surface creates a hot spring. In volcanic areas, water may be heated when it comes into contact with molten rock. If it boils and builds up steam pressure, it erupts at the surface and we called it a geyser.

    What's So Hot About Hot Springs?

    Besides the obvious benefits for relaxation and cleanliness, people around the world and throughout history have believed that bathing in hot springs has therapeutic benefits. Here are just a few:

    • Blood circulation and cell oxygenation is increased, which helps dissolve and eliminate toxins from the body.
    • The body's temperature is increased, killing germs and viruses on and in the body.
    • Bathing repeatedly over a period of 3-4 weeks can normalize endocrine gland functions and autonomic nervous system function.
    • It increases metabolism and stimulates secretions in the intestinal tract and liver, which aids digestion.
    • It increases oxygen-rich blood flow throughout the body, which improves nourishment to vital organs and tissues.
    • Mineral springs have high amounts of negative ions, which encourage feelings of well-being physically and psychologically.
    • The body absorbs trace amounts of minerals such as carbon dioxide, lithium, sulfure, magnesium, and calcium. This provides healing to various organs, stimulates and enhances the immune system, encourages physical and mental relaxation, produces endorphins, and normalizes gland functions.
    • It improves joint mobility.
    • It can improve quality of sleep and can reduce incidents of insomnia.
    • It can lower blood pressure.
    • If the water is mineralized (especially if with sulfur), it can improve the effects of skin diseases such as psoriasis, dermatitis, and fungal infections.
    Hot Springs: The Original Hot Tubs
    photo by cgcolman / Pixabay

    Where Can I Find a Hot Spring?

    Hot springs can be found all over the world, but tend to be clustered around fault lines and areas of volcanic activity. For example, in the United States the majority of hot springs are located in the West. Check tourist websites for hot springs in your country. In the US, hot spring guides for every state are readily available on the Internet. Many springs are developed, while others are quite raw and natural. Some are on well-traveled tourist paths; others are only accessible to hikers.

    Some countries are famous for their hot springs, and some hot springs are more famous than others. Japan, the United States, Taiwan, and China (Pacific Rim countries) are particularly noted for their hot springs. However, some remarkable springs are located in Costa Rica, Iceland, and Iran.

    Here are a few remarkable springs:

    • Budapest, Hungary--The area under the city is rich with springs, feeding more than 50 public baths and pools, private spas, and even drinking fountains.
    • The Nine Hells of Beppu, Japan--These remarkable springs are very distinct from each other, and each has a unique name. For example, the White Pond Hell has water colored white by excess calcium. The most famous and photogenic is Blood Pond Hell, with waters colored red by ferrous minerals seeping up from the bottom of the pond.
    • Bath, England--Springs in this area of England have been in use as far back as 8000 BC. The Romans first constructed baths there in the first century.
    • Lake Hévíz, Hévíz, Hungary--This is the second largest thermal lake in the world, and it is believed that the waters of the lake are completely replenished each day.
    • Saturnia, Tuscany, Italy--This sulfurous spring features natural pools cut into the rock and a waterfall of hot water.

    Hot Spring Bathing Etiquette

    There are no firm rules on how to bathe in hot springs--they will vary greatly from area to area and by type of hot spring. Developed springs and private springs will generally have posted rules. Springs located in out-of-the way places accessible only by hikers will have no official rules, but there are still some basic manners you should practice to ensure the springs can be enjoyed by everyone.

    Some "rules" for bathing in hot springs:

    • Follow any posted rules.
    • Shower prior to entering the spring. This helps maintain the cleanliness of the water.
    • Do not use springs during your menstrual cycle.
    • Do not soak for too long--about 30 minutes is a good limit. This ensures you do not become faint and risk injury or death. At smaller springs, it also ensures that everyone gets time in the spring. It's also advisable not to soak more than 3 times a day.
    • Avoid bathing 30 minutes prior to eating and for 1 hour after eating.
    • Before entering the water, test the temperature with a finger or toe to ensure it is not too hot. People have died from accidentally or purposefully entering boiling springs.
    • Hydrate before and after bathing. Sports drinks or water are best.
    • Do not drink alcohol while bathing! This can lead to injury or death.
    • Do not allow pets to enter the hot springs. This is for the safety of the animal, as well as to keep the spring clean.
    • If sharing a spring with others, refrain from too much conversation so everyone can relax.
    • Be aware of clothing rules for the particular spring--some springs require nudity, others require bathing suits. For secluded springs in the wilderness, use your own discretion based on likely traffic in the area and your own comfort.
    • Speaking of clothing, if wearing a suit be aware that any detergents used to clean the suit will transfer to the spring water. It's a good idea to have a suit specifically for the spring that has only been rinsed in water and not washed with soap. Simply wring out and air dry when finished.
    • Pregnant women and individuals should not use hot springs.
    • Avoid getting spring water in your eyes, nose, or mouth (unless it is a spring specifically designated for drinking). Many types of organisms survive in the hot waters and can cause diseases such as meningitis and Legionnaires' if they enter the body.
    • If at a spring in a remote location, set up your camp at least 200 feet away to avoid contaminating the water.
    • Avoid engaging in adult situations in the hot spring. This is for the comfort of other bathers, to maintain spring cleanliness, and to avoid becoming infected with any viruses or bacteria living in the water.

    The Original Hot Tubbers photo by Yosemite / Wikimedia

    Share Your Hot Spring Experiences!

    Do you visit hot springs? Tell us your favorite bathing spots! Did using natural hot springs inspire you to purchase a hot tub? Share your hot spring stories with us in the comments below!

     

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